Based in Sydney, Australia, Foundry is a blog by Rebecca Thao. Her posts explore modern architecture through photos and quotes by influential architects, engineers, and artists.

Mental wellbeing is a journey, not a destination

Mental wellbeing is a journey, not a destination

hi mama,

You thought you were through it, I know. The anxiety. The crippling panic attacks. The desire to withdraw.

You'd recovered from post-natal depression. You'd come off your medication slowly. You'd been mindful of your triggers and made sure you practiced your CBT, slept and ate well (mostly), exercised and didn't abuse stimulants like caffeine and alcohol (mostly). 

So why? Why do you feel so anxious again? Why does the thought of doing the school run fill you with such dread? Why does your head spin and the dizziness paralyse you when you find yourself standing up, talking in social situations? PANIC. It doesn't make sense. You can't make it make sense. 

You'd recovered from post-natal depression. 

Of course, you know better than this. You know that the monster can rear its ugly head, whenever it chooses. The monster always tricks you into thinking the worst. Fearing the worst. And the cruellest part? Despite knowing this a million times over, you cannot believe your own mantra, right now. Because, no matter how hard you try, you just can't rationalise the feelings, like you usually can. The monster has made sure of that. 

Mental wellbeing is a journey, not a destination. In your days of feeling well, you have forgotten this. You have forgotten that there is nothing logical about anxiety and depression. That you don't even have to have anything to feel sad about. That depression is a physical illness; a depletion of serotonin. 

You'd recovered from post-natal depression. 

But it's time to put your hand up and ask for help. Again. 

And you will get through this. Again. With some help from your medication, which you always promised yourself you would take in a heartbeat, should the need arise. You will get some more therapy. To work through some of the feelings you thought you'd dealt with. The feelings that the panic attacks suggest might need a little more attention. 

You will be humbled by the experience. Again. By the support of others. Their kindness and understanding. 

And, you will talk about your experience, openly. Because there is no shame in the efforts you must take to maintain your mental wellbeing. It will help others because communicating connects us. It makes us realise we are never alone. That there is always someone else who knows.

You are going to feel well. Again. 

You will go on. Again.

I believe in you. 

Amy x

 Amy is the author of 'The New Mum's Notebook' and the upcoming 'The Not-So-New Mum's Notebook, which will be published in September. You can follow Amy on Instagram -  @survivingmotherhood_ .   Think another mama could benefit from reading this letter? Share by clicking on the social icons below...

Amy is the author of 'The New Mum's Notebook' and the upcoming 'The Not-So-New Mum's Notebook, which will be published in September. You can follow Amy on Instagram - @survivingmotherhood_.

Think another mama could benefit from reading this letter? Share by clicking on the social icons below...

Twin boys. Identical twin boys.

Twin boys. Identical twin boys.

Breakdown, but not out

Breakdown, but not out